Operation Storm

Operation Storm

Japan's Top Secret Submarines and Its Plan to Change the Course of World War II

Book - 2013
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The riveting true story of Japan's top secret plan to change the course of World War II using a squadron of mammoth submarines a generation ahead of their time
 
In 1941, the architects of Japan's sneak attack on Pearl Harbor planned a bold follow-up: a potentially devastating air raid--this time against New York City and Washington, DC. The classified Japanese program required developing a squadron of top secret submarines--the Sen-toku or I-400 class--which were, by far, the largest and among the most deadly subs of World War II.  Incredibly, the subs were designed as underwater aircraft carriers, each equipped with three Aichi M6A1 attack bombers painted to look like US aircraft. The bombers, called Seiran (which translates as "storm from a clear sky"), were tucked in a huge, water tight hanger on the sub's deck. The subs mission was to travel more than half way around the world, surface on the US coast, and launch their deadly air attack. This entire operation was unknown to US intelligence, despite having broken the Japanese naval code. And the amazing thing is how close the Japanese came to pulling off their mission.

Meticulously researched and masterfully told, Operation Storm tells the harrowing story of the Sen Toku, their desperate push into Allied waters, and the dramatic chase of this juggernaut sub by the US navy.  Author John Geoghegan's first person accounts from the last surviving members of both the I-401 crew and the US boarding party that captured her create a highly intimate portrait of this fascinating, and until now forgotten story of war in the Pacific. 
Publisher: New York : Crown Publishers, c2013
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780307464804
0307464806
Branch Call Number: History 940.5451 GEO

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SEBoiko
Jun 03, 2013

Given Soviet interest, US officials denied the Russians access by scuttling Yamamoto's subs.

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SEBoiko
Jun 03, 2013

When Emperor Hirohito announced his desire for peace, most Japanese were confused, particularty since he never used the word surrender.

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SEBoiko
Jun 03, 2013

The IJN's high command refused to believe their codes had been compromised.

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SEBoiko
Jun 03, 2013

Though it's true that the United States knew nothing about the Panama Canal strike, they did know something about the I-400's.

s
SEBoiko
May 23, 2013

The United States began experimenting with its own version of a plane-carrying sub in 1923.

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SEBoiko
May 23, 2013

At least six countries experimented with sub-plane combinations with varying degrees of success, but only Japan was able to carry out the ideas to fruition.

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SEBoiko
May 23, 2013

Though Germany, Britian, the United States, and Italt "passed" on the plane-carrying sub concept, France was next, and her commitment was big.

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