Alias Grace

Alias Grace

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In Alias Grace , the bestselling author of The Handmaid's Tale takes readers into the life of one of the most notorious women of the nineteenth century--recently adapted into a 6-part Netflix original mini-series by director Mary Harron and writer/actress Sarah Polley.

It's 1843, and Grace Marks has been convicted for her involvement in the vicious murders of her employer and his housekeeper and mistress. Some believe Grace is innocent; others think her evil or insane. Now serving a life sentence, Grace claims to have no memory of the murders. An up-and-coming expert in the burgeoning field of mental illness is engaged by a group of reformers and spiritualists who seek a pardon for Grace. He listens to her story while bringing her closer and closer to the day she cannot remember. What will he find in attempting to unlock her memories? Captivating and disturbing, Alias Grace showcases bestselling, Booker Prize-winning author Margaret Atwood at the peak of her powers.
Publisher: New York : Nan A. Talese
Copyright Date: ©1996
ISBN: 9780307797957
Characteristics: text file, rda
Additional Contributors: OverDrive, Inc. - Distributor

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k
KnottFamLibrary
Aug 04, 2020

This is one of my favorite books of all time. Atwood’s poetic writing is full of depth and literary complexity.
It holds history, mystery, trauma coping, beautiful writing, and a book that left an impression on me forever.

l
lozza1401
Jun 12, 2020

I read this so I could watch the Netflix series and now I have no inclination to watch the series. I love Atwood's writing style but I felt so many questions were unanswered. This suits the mystery of the enigmatic Grace Marks but if Atwood had embellished further I would have enjoyed it more. Some conversations are so intense and descriptive that made it easy for my brain to wander.

l
lopmoney
Apr 03, 2020

Amazing book that follows a girl with the alias grace who was put into prison for murder of her master and their mistress, she finally gets released on a conditional day release and a doctor tries to evaluate her mental state to eventual attempt to get her acquitted. Mystery, drama, and romance galore. Incredible book from an incredible author.

b
becker
Jan 20, 2020

I found this to be a very engrossing read. Great book club pick. Lots to talk about.

m
mini_moon_pie
Jun 04, 2019

After a while, I felt that the book was captured so well in the TV show that I was convinced I could have skipped the novel. However, the chapters have clips of newspaper articles about the real Grace Marks and selections from a Ms. Moody, who interviewed the real Grace and wrote a book. Then ending, too, gave a better sense of what Grace was feeling than the TV show did, and I was glad for that. It comes full circle when another man asks her to describe the abuse she’s suffered, leaning in when she gets to the pawing would-be rapists. You’re left wondering what will happen to him, if anything, and if he can be trusted.

Overall, enjoy the TV show and the book! I recommend both.

i
Inga57
Mar 07, 2019

Book group selection - Kindle Immersion read
True Crime Story riveting the nations of Canada, USA, and England during the middle of the nineteenth century. Barbara Mujica says it best: “[Atwood] brings to life not only the enigmatic and fascinating Grace Marks, but also an entire period in Canada’s history.” Mujica also points out the theme of quilts, which Atwood used throughout the work. Grace Marks was noted for her fine sewing skills, particularly quilting. Atwood uses a different quilting pattern for the title of each of their chapters to reflect Marks’s skills and to set a theme for that section of the story. “The novel is structured like a quilt in which each piece contributes to the total image, yet often the image changes form, depending on the angle from which it is viewed.”

i
Inga57
Feb 12, 2019

Book Group Selection
True Crime Story riveting the nations of Canada, USA, and England during the middle of the nineteenth century. Barbara Mujica says it best: “[Atwood] brings to life not only the enigmatic and fascinating Grace Marks, but also an entire period in Canada’s history.” Mujica also points out the theme of quilts, which Atwood used throughout the work. Grace Marks was noted for her fine sewing skills, particularly quilting. Atwood uses a different quilting pattern for the title of each of their chapters to reflect Marks’s skills and to set a theme for that section of the story. “The novel is structured like a quilt in which each piece contributes to the total image, yet often the image changes form, depending on the angle from which it is viewed.”

j
jasminestea
Aug 18, 2018

I could not for the life of me get into this book. The pace and content were too slow for me, although the descriptions were interesting. I absolutely loved The Handmaid's Tale, so I was very excited to start another of Atwood's books. However, the thing about Atwood seems to be that she is not contained within one genre -- I loved her futuristic/political/feminist/dystopian novel, but was not interested in the historical aspect of this one. I will say that I really enjoyed the show adaptation, though. If you are into historical whodunit crime stories, this is definitely going to peak your interest.

s
SuyunJiang
Jul 29, 2018

An excellent book for feminists~

o
orange_lobster_23
Apr 18, 2018

A suspenseful Canadian-who-done-it based on a notorious highly publicized 150 year old murder of a wealthy landowner and his housekeeper/mistress; Atwood's narrative probes the life and inner thoughts of the controversial alleged murderess, Grace Mark. Simon Jordan's, amnesia expert and forensic psychologist, attempts to unlock Grace's repressed memories of the murders becomes a "cat-mouse" chase with the cunning Grace. Atwood deftly weaves irony, wit and social commentary into a brutal crime. I was a skeptic (did she, or didn't she) up to the end.

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FavouriteFiction Oct 03, 2009

A fictional account of the 1843 trial of 16-year-old Canadian housemaid Grace Marks who was found guilty of the murder of her employer and his mistress.

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