Adam Bede

Adam Bede

Book - 2008
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Carpenter Adam Bede is in love with the beautiful Hetty Sorrel, but unknown to him, he has a rival, in the local squire's son Arthur Donnithorne. Hetty is soon attracted by Arthur's seductive charm and they begin to meet in secret. The relationship is to have tragic consequences that reach far beyond the couple themselves, touching not just Adam Bede, but many others, not least, pious Methodist Preacher Dinah Morris. A tale of seduction, betrayal, love and deception, the plot of Adam Bede has the quality of an English folk song. Within the setting of Hayslope, a small, rural community, Eliot brilliantly creates a sense of earthy reality, making the landscape itself as vital a presence in the novel as that of her characters themselves.
Publisher: London ; New York : Penguin, c2008
ISBN: 9780140436648
0140436642
Branch Call Number: F Eli
Additional Contributors: Reynolds, Margaret 1957-

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Janice21383
Apr 08, 2017

The title is Adam Bede, but it should be Hetty Sorrel, the shallow but fascinating character who draws both the other characters and the reader to her. It would be easy to dismiss George Eliot's harsh portrayal of this 17-year-old working class girl as the jealousy of a plain woman towards a pretty one, though there is something to that. But in the 19th century, this story would have been difficult or impossible to get published if Hetty had not been held somewhat to blame for her own fate. Eliot went so far as to set her story in an earlier time; perish the thought that her contemporaries would seduce peasant girls or that illegitimacy was a fact of rural life. However, there are real life Hettys, both then and now, and their stories are seldom simple black and white. The difference is that the fate of a modern Hetty is usually much less brutal, and we should be grateful for it. For those who may find this book long, you can skip early chapters about Adam's workshop, and his brother, and skim Dinah's preaching -- they're mostly irrelevant to the rest of the story.

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kamilla1
Aug 15, 2011

The style of Eliot and other Victorian writers, including Dickens, was such that they sometimes appear to be going off in tangents. This was very much in the style of the period, when the novel was viewed as having a didactic purpose.

renabackstrom Dec 03, 2010

This is a fascinating story though somewhat slow. I found it distracting that Eliot often goes off on tangents.

You can tell that Eliot was not a fiction writer to begin with.

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