The Lost Weekend

The Lost Weekend

DVD - 2000
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A would-be writer's dissatisfaction with his life leads him on a three-day binge. This film gives an uncompromising look at the devastating effects of alcoholism.

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m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Bim: "Now be a good boy and drink this." Don: "I don't want it." Bim: "Better take it. Liable to be a little floor show later on around here. Might get on your nerves." Don: "Floor show?" Bim: "Ever have the D.T.'s?" Don: "NO!" Bim: "You will brother." Don: "NOT ME." Bim: "Like to make a little bet? After all, you're just a freshman. Wait til you're a sophomore. That's when you start seeing the little animals. You know that stuff about pink elephants? That's the bunk. It's little animals. Little tiny turkeys in straw hats. Midget monkeys coming through the keyhole. See that guy over there? With him it's beetles. Come tonight he sees beetles crawling all over him. Has to be dark though. It's like the doctor was just telling me... delirium is a disease of the night. (chuckles)... Good night!"

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Nat (to Don): "One's too many and a hundred's not enough."

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Don Birnam (to Wick and Helen): "Most men lead lives of quiet desperation. I can't TAKE quiet desperation!"

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Helen St. James: "Don's a little 'tight'. Most people drink a little... A lot of them get 'tight' once in a while..." Don Birnam: "Sure... the LUCKY ones who can 'take it' or 'leave it'... But then there are the ones who CAN'T take it and CAN'T leave it either... What I'm trying to say is - I'm NOT a DRINKER... I'm a DRUNK."

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Wick Birnam (to Don): "Won't you ever learn that with YOU it's like stepping off a roof and expecting to fall JUST ONE FLOOR!!"

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Nat: "Hey... How 'bout you eatin' some of this?" Don Birnam: "Take it away." Nat: "You gotta eat somethin' sometime!" Don Birnam: "Just gimme another drink." Nat: "Mr. Boinem, this is the MORNIN'!" Don Birnam: "That's when you need it MOST, in the morning. Haven't you learned that yet? At night, the stuff's a drink. In the morning, it's MEDICINE."

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Wick Birnam: "WHO are we FOOLING? We've tried everything, haven't we. We've REASONED with him, we've BABIED him, we've watched him like a hawk. We've tried trusting him. How often have you cried? How often have I beaten him up? Scrape him out of a gutter and pump some kind of SELF RESPECT into him and BACK he falls, BACK IN EVERY TIME." Helen St. James (sobs): "He's a sick person. It's as though there was something wrong with his heart or his lungs. You wouldn't walk out on him if he had an attack. He needs our help." Wick Birnam: "He won't accept our help. Not Don, he hates us. He wants to be alone with that BOTTLE of his. It's ALL he gives a hang about. Why KID ourselves? He's a HOPELESS ALCOHOLIC."

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Don Birnam: "It shrinks my liver, doesn't it, Nat? It pickles my kidneys, yes. But what does it do to my mind? It tosses the sandbags overboard so the balloon can soar. Suddenly I'm above the ordinary. I'm competent. SUPREMELY competent. I'm walking a tightrope over Niagara Falls. I'M one of the GREAT ONES. I'm Michaelangelo, molding the beard of Moses. I'm Van Gogh painting pure sunlight. I'm Horowitz, playing the Emperor Concerto. I'm John Barrymore before the movies got him by the throat. I'm Jesse James and his two brothers, all three of them. I'm W. Shakespeare. And out there it's not Third Avenue any longer, it's the Nile, Nat. It's the Nile and down it moves... the barge of Cleopatra."

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Nat: "Aw Mr. Boinem - why don't you lay off the stuff for awhile?" Don Birnam: "Oh, I may never touch it while I'm there... not a drop. What you don't understand, all of you, is that I've GOT to know it's around. That I can HAVE IT if I need it. I CAN'T be cut off completely... That's the DEVIL... THAT'S what drives you CRAZY..." Nat: "Yeah, I know. I know a lotta guys like that. They take a bottle and put it on a shelf. All they wanna do is just look at it. They don't even take the corkscrew out, just to make sure. Then all of a sudden, they GRAB the bottle... *CHOMP* ...bite off the neck..."

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Gloria: "Hello Mr. Birnam. Happy to have you back with the 'organization'..."

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Scaltro Aug 18, 2014

Though this won several academy awards, I found this to be outdated and overdramatic. The theme is sad and serious but really Hollywood dramatic. not my favorite.

i
Isley
Jul 08, 2014

Wilder doesn’t make bad movies and while this was no exception, the “social conscience” elements and implausible ending are enough to turn me off of it. I mostly have issues with the general heavy-handedness of its depiction of alcoholism–which I realize isn’t entirely fair as there really weren’t any portraits of alcoholism before this so it probably had to be “laid on a bit thick” to get the message across (which is part of my problem with “social conscience films” in the first place).

rufus_red4 Jun 27, 2014

A very earnest depiction of a man in the throes of alcoholism. Often disturbing and unflinching, Ray Milland gives an exceptional performance in the lead role. The ending is undoubtedly melodramatic and securely Hollywood but other than that, this is an historic picture.

7duffy Jun 23, 2014

Very good, except for the Hollywood ending.

t
toolbelttom
Apr 17, 2014

Damaged, couldn't be played

m
Monolith
Feb 17, 2013

Absolutely incredible movie. A very risky film for Paramount to put out -- the audiences of 1945 weren't necessarily ready for the harsh realities of alcoholism on the big screen. Paramount succumbed, and paid fifty grand for the movie rights on Billy Wilder's prompting. Now I don't know if it was the original novelist Charles Jackson, or Billy Wilder, or a combination thereof - but this came from someone who identified with the experiences of living 'as' or 'with' an alcoholic. No doubt. (It's rumored that this was a "slam" from Wilder against writer Raymond Chandler, whom he detested, after co-writing 1944's "Double Indemnity" with him.) Astonishing, textbook realism. Ray Milland was outstanding, did his preparatory work for the role... even stayed in 'Bellevue' briefly for research! (See bonus features). The entire cast was terrific. This Oscar winning film is a heart wrenching treasure. FIVE STARS.

owllover Dec 31, 2012

Really good movie. I have seen every movie to win the academy award for best picture made before 1960 and of them all this one and All Quiet on the Western Front have been the only ones to really impress me. I like the film style and the way the story is told alot. it is raw and really gives a sense of the main charactar's desperation.

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