Dear Mili

Dear Mili

An Old Tale

Book - 1988
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On September 28, 1983, the discovery of a previously unknown tale by Wilhelm Grimm was reported on the front page of The New York Times . "After more than 150 years," the Times noted, "Hansel and Gretel, Snow-White, Rumpelstiltskin, and Cinderella will be joined by another Grimm fairy-tale character." The story of dear Mili was preserved in a letter Wilhelm Grimm wrote to a little girl in 1816, a letter that remained in her family's possession for over a century and a half. It tells of a mother who sends her daughter into the forest to save her from a terrible war. The child comes upon the hut of an old man, who gives her shelter, and she repays his kindness by serving him faithfully for what she thinks are three days. Actually, thirty years have passed, but Mili has remained safe, and with the old man's blessing there is still time for a tender reunion with her mother. As for the pictures that interpret Dear Mili --hailed by School Library Journal as "gorgeous"--they were a milestone in Maurice Sendak's career, the work of a master at the height of his powers.

Publisher: New York : Michael di Capua Books/Farrar, Straus, Giroux, 1988
Edition: 1st ed
ISBN: 9780374317621
0374317623
Branch Call Number: Ju 398.2 Gri
Additional Contributors: Sendak, Maurice
Manheim, Ralph 1907-1992

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QueenBoadicea Sep 28, 2015

A mother’s desperate attempt to save her little girl from the horrors of war sends the child on a strange, mystical journey through a dark wood…

Stories about little girls lost in the forest are rife with the dangers the wild poses to such innocents. But this wilderness is merely a journey—albeit a frightening one—on the way to a magical, strange place. This Grimm tale is rife with religious and spiritual overtones but they are very easy to bear.

The final message is bittersweet but tender. The reader is comforted, much as Mili is, with the promise of a happy afterlife, one that is posited as attainable in this world and promised for the next, at least for its beloved innocents. The book is lushly illustrated by the incomparable Maurice Sendak, with Mili being surrounded by the entanglement of a menacing forest as well as the ripe beauty of a never-fading garden.

FindingJane Sep 28, 2015

A mother’s desperate attempt to save her little girl from the horrors of war sends the child on a strange, mystical journey through a dark wood…

Stories about little girls lost in the forest are rife with the dangers the wild poses to such innocents. But this wilderness is merely a journey—albeit a frightening one—on the way to a magical, strange place. This Grimm tale is rife with religious and spiritual overtones but they are very easy to bear.

The final message is bittersweet but tender. The reader is comforted, much as Mili is, with the promise of a happy afterlife, one that is posited as attainable in this world and promised for the next, at least for its beloved innocents. The book is lushly illustrated by the incomparable Maurice Sendak, with Mili being surrounded by the entanglement of a menacing forest as well as the ripe beauty of a never-fading garden.

m
mswendybe
Aug 04, 2012

Not a bad story, maybe a little sappy for my tastes, but I really picked up this book because of Maurice Sendak's illustrations. Gorgeous!

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