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The Art of the Steal

(DVD - 2010)
Average Rating: 4 stars out of 5.
The Art of the Steal
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It's been called the greatest theft of art since the Second World War. Reveals how a private collection of paintings became the envy of the Louvre, the Metropolitan Museum of Art, and other major institutions, and the prize in a battle between one man's vision and the forces of commerce and politics. Founded in 1922 by wealthy American drug developer and art collector Albert C. Barnes, the Barnes Foundation became the finest collection of paintings by Renoir, Cezanne, Matisse, and Van Gogh.
Publisher: New York : IFC in Theaters : MPI Media Group, c2010
ISBN: 0788613138
Branch Call Number: DVD 708.148 ART

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Dec 18, 2013
  • rooibos rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

Shocking, educational - a must see. Joined their facebook after watching this movie.

Dec 05, 2013
  • ms_mustard rated this: 3.5 stars out of 5.

the politically engineered take over of one of the world's best art collections. yes, it's wonderful that more people will be able to see it. Should the collector's wishes have been so circumvented? who gets to say?

Apr 25, 2013
  • VRMurphy rated this: 4 stars out of 5.

A very well-done documentary. It's unfortunate that the people on the other side of this issue declined invitations to comment, because the rather shameful impression is that they don't, won't or can't contest the facts as set out here.

the recent program on PBS on this topic almost completely ignored all this nasty underside. Gee, you don't suppose one of these "charitable" foundations that high jacked the collection had anything to do with the PBS version of events. The official version. Dustin Hoffman's Wag the Dog is still one of the best studies of the essential role of media in the white wash that is modern capitalism in its decadent stage. Reality television indeed!

Nov 13, 2011
  • badgirls rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

One of the best documentaries i've seen in a long time.
Fascinating story of how the City of Philadelphia, the Annebergs {rich conservative family in the U.S.} and the Pew Foundation got hold of a priceless art collection by using politics, charitable status and few other very questionable "tactics" to do this.

For example the Pew Foundation, one of the biggest "charities" around, behaves just like any money grubbing lying corporation to get what it wants, namely control of the Barnes collection.

Jan 30, 2011
  • CalicoJack rated this: 5 stars out of 5.

This riveting documentary details the Philadelphia establishment’s controversial takeover and move of the foundation and priceless art collection of Dr. Albert Barnes--in direct contravention of Barne’s wishes and the terms of his trust. Especially fascinating for anyone interested in art, culture, or scandals.

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